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Car insurance for young drivers florida

Florida Car Insurance

Florida law requires residents of FL to have car insurance. You must purchase the minimum coverage amounts for both personal injury protection (PIP) insurance and property damage liability (PDL) car insurance.

Luckily, Florida offsets this coverage requirement by offering some of the lowest car insurance coverage minimums in the country.

Learn more about Florida's car insurance requirements, the effects of traffic violations on premium costs, and how to get the best quotes on car insurance available.

FL Auto Insurance Requirements

Florida is a no-fault insurance state. If you are injured in an accident, your car insurance will pay your medical costs up to your policy's limits, regardless of who caused the accident.

The minimum limits for Florida car insurance coverage are:

  • $10,000 of no-fault or personal injury protection (PIP) insurance.
  • $10,000 of property damage liability (PDL) insurance.

Personal Injury Protection

In addition to covering your part of any medical expenses and income loss that result from a car accident, your Personal Injury Protection, or PIP, insurance will also cover:

  • Your child and other members of your household.
  • Your child (when he or she is riding on a school bus).
  • You (when you are a pedestrian or bicyclist involved in a car accident.)
  • Passengers in your car who do not have their own PIP insurance and do not own a car.

Anyone in your car who has PIP car insurance will be covered by his or her own policy if you get in a car accident. Likewise, your PIP car insurance will cover you while you are a passenger in someone else's car.

Property Damage Liability

Property Damage Liability (PDL) auto insurance in Florida will cover you for damages you cause in a car accident to someone else's property, such as homes or buildings.

Violation Penalties and Fines

The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHSMV) requires your insurance company to electronically notify them if there is a cancellation of your insurance policy.

If the DHSMV has no record of your current car insurance policy, you will be notified by mail. The notification will give you a date of suspension. If you are not able to provide the DHSMV a proof of insurance before the suspension date, your driver's license, plates, and registration will all be suspended.

To reinstate these, you will have to provide proof of Florida insurance and pay a fee of:

  • $150 for your first offense.
  • $250 for your second offense.
  • $500 for each offense after.

If you are able to provide proof of insurance to the DHSMV before the date of suspension, you will not face any penalties.

You can provide your proof of insurance:

  • Online at the DHSMV website.
  • In person at a driver license office.
  • By phone at (850) 617-2000.

If you no longer own the car, surrender your plates and registration to the Florida DHSMV to avoid suspension of your FL driver's license.

Optional Car Insurance in Florida

While Florida law mandates the minimum amounts of coverage you must purchase, you always have the option of purchasing higher amounts of coverage on your property injury protection and property damage liability coverage.

Also, for those looking for more comprehensive coverage, most Florida car insurance companies will offer the following types of optional coverage:

  • Comprehensive – This coverage will pay for damages to your car that do not result from accidents, e.g., scratches to your car's paint due to vandalism.
  • Collision – This coverage will pay for accident-related damages to your car.
  • Towing and labor.
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist – This coverage will pay for damages incurred by incidents with drivers who do not have insurance.
  • Rental car coverage.

NOTE: While comprehensive and collision coverage policies are not required by Florida law, your lender will require you to purchase both if you are financing your car.

Bodily Injury Liability

One of the major reasons that Florida requires no-fault car insurance is to protect FL drivers from being sued after an accident. However, if you get into an accident, there's still a chance the victim(s) will sue you, especially if one or more victims suffers severe injury or if there is a fatality.

To help cover you in these cases, you can get Bodily Injury Liability (BIL) car insurance in Florida. If you have BIL coverage and you are found responsible for an accident, this coverage helps to pay for injuries to the victims of that accident, up to the coverage limits of the policy.

Bodily injury liability coverage will even help pay for the cost of a lawyer if you are sued after an accident.

Insurance Penalties: SR-22 and FR-44

In Florida, you may be required to purchase additional car insurance if you've been in a car accident or you've had certain traffic violation convictions.

SR-22 in Florida

Certain incidents or violations may require you to carry an SR-22 certification, which mandates that you purchase bodily injury liability, or BIL, car insurance on top of the basic Florida car insurance requirements.

You will have to carry an SR-22 for 3 years IF:

  • You are involved in a car accident that causes injuries or property damage.
  • You have had your driver's license suspended due to excessive traffic violation points.
  • Your driver's license has been habitually revoked.

If you are found guilty of driving without car insurance, you may have to carry a 6-month non-cancelable SR-22 for up to 2 years. A 6-month non-cancelable SR-22 requires you to pay your entire premium up front each time you renew your policy.

FR-44 in Florida

If you are convicted of a DUI in Florida, you may be required to purchase additional insurance and file an FR-44 form as proof of that coverage. FR-44 certificates are required when a driver has been convicted of a DUI and did not hold the following amounts of coverage for bodily injury liability and property damage liability insurance on the date of the arrest:

  • $100,000 for injuries to any one person.
  • $300,000 for injuries to all people in one accident.
  • $50,000 for property damage liability (PDL).

If you are subject to the FR-44 requirement, you will need to add BIL and PDL coverage to your policy, with the minimums shown above.

You must have your FR-44 for at least 3 years from the date of suspension.

Driving under the influence is not only dangerous, but it can also be extremely costly. Stay safe and keep your car insurance premiums down.

The Most Stolen Cars In Florida

Driving a car that is known to be a target for car theft may increase your car insurance premium.

The following is a list of 2013's most stolen cars in Florida according to www.nicb.org:

  1. Ford Pickup (Full Size).
  2. Honda Civic.
  3. Honda Accord.
  4. Nissan Altima.
  5. Toyota Camry.
  6. Toyota Corolla.
  7. Nissan Maxima.
  8. Chevrolet Pickup (Full Size).
  9. Dodge Pickup (Full Size).
  10. Dodge Caravan.

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Starting to drive is an exciting moment for teens, but for their parents, it can be stressful and it will certainly be expensive. The good news is that you can check quotes from different insurance companies and minimize the damage to your wallet. Let us guide you through buying car insurance for young drivers to help you save money.

Find out about…
• Policies
• Rates
• Discounts
• Cars
• Insurance for College Students

Policies

Before your teen starts driving, you should know:

  • All drivers in a household need to be added to a car insurance policy. There is no easy or cheap way to get around car insurance for a new driver. Either you need to add your teen to your policy, or the teen needs his own policy.
  • Sharing a joint policy with a teen is cheaper than paying for separate policies. Additionally, there is no benefit to a teen getting his own policy. This doesn't mean, however, that you should simply add your teen to your current policy and be done with it. Adding a new driver means your company generates your rates all over again, and a different company may give you a better deal. Shop around by getting quotes from several companies.

Do I have to add my teen once he has a learner’s permit?

The process of insuring a new driver typically starts when the teen gets a learner's permit. Once teens get a learner's permit (aka provisional license or instruction permit in some states), some companies allow you to add them to your policy at no additional charge until they get their licenses or turn 18. They allow this because state permit-holder laws require a licensed driver age 21 or older in the passenger seat, making the young driver less of a risk. Other auto insurance providers require that teens be added when they are in the permit stage, so check with your provider.

Do I have to add my teen to my policy if he doesn’t own a car?

Yes. It doesn’t matter that he doesn’t have his own car; he has access to yours. If you don’t add him to your policy and he is in an accident, your policy may not cover him. Some car insurance companies explicitly note in their policies that unless you notify them of additional drivers or risks, those individuals will not be covered. If they do cover the accident, the insurer may require you to pay back premiums from the time the teen was licensed.

If your teen is getting a license but isn’t going to drive your cars -- ever -- then in some states, some insurers will let you exclude the teen from your policy. If you do exclude a teen, or anyone, from your policy, there will be no car insurance coverage extended if they are in an accident. Many insurance companies want you to tell them about household residents who are over a certain age (usually 15) whether that person is licensed or not.

Do I have to tell my insurance company about my teen if he isn’t licensed?

Yes, you usually do. When you renew your policy, you are usually asked for information on everyone in your household. If your child hasn’t received a permit or license yet, the teen usually can be listed as unlicensed on your policy. When a young driver is noted as unlicensed, he also should be unrated by the car insurance company, meaning the teen wouldn't affect your rates.

Who should insure a teen if the parents are divorced?

In general, the custodial parent’s policy is primary for the newly licensed driver. However, if the child will drive when staying at the second home, both parents typically need to list the teen as a driver. Car insurance companies deal with this situation differently, so check with your company and ask what your new rates will be. This way you’ll know what to shoot for if you decide to shop around for a better deal.

How can a teen get his own policy?

A teen driver can get a car insurance policy of his own, but if he’s under 18, a parent or guardian signature is required on the policy since insurance is a legal contract. Even if you are willing to sign on the policy with a young driver, keep in mind that it’s cheaper if the teen is added to your policy instead. Read our age-specific guides for teen drivers to see how rates differ depending on whether the teen is on his own policy or the parent;s:

  • 16-year-old
  • 17-year-old
  • 18-year-old
  • 19-year-old

Rates


How much does car insurance for new drivers cost?

Our analysis of the cost of adding a teen driver showed an average increase of 160% when a married couple added a teenage boy to their car insurance policy. This number can only be used to give you a very general sense of how much your rates will increase. Every situation is different, and rates depend on your insurance provider, coverage options, ZIP code, vehicles, driving records, how much you drive and many more factors.

Why is car insurance for young drivers so expensive?

Teens are inexperienced behind the wheel and immature by nature. That's a bad combination. A brand-new driver is 12 times more likely to have an accident than someone with a year of experience, says the National Institutes of Health. A 16-year-old who’s had one accident is 50 percent more likely to have another, says the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. In addition, maturity levels change quickly. Teens who get their licenses at age 18 have fewer fatal accidents than those who are licensed at age 16. Many insurers no longer lump all young drivers together but instead rate age groups separately.

At what age do young drivers' rates go down?

The age of 25 is typically when insurance companies begin to offer the same rates they do to all other adults. Some carriers will lower rates for women when they turn 21 and men when they turn 24. Once you’re no longer priced as a “young driver,” your insurance provider will rate you based on your driving record rather than those for young drivers in general. In addition to rating drivers based on age, insurers can also levy a surcharge for inexperience, usually for those who have been licensed less than a year. To get a better sense of how insurance rates change by age, see average insurance rates by age.

Discounts


Good student discount

Encourage your kid to do well in school because student car insurance discounts can help bring down your rates. Each insurer has its own guidelines, but typically the discount can be 10 percent to 15 percent. Each insurer always has its own rule for what constitutes a “good student” – either a 3.0 grade point average or above, placement on dean’s list or honor roll, or ranking in the top 20 percent of the class.

Safe driver discount

Look into discounts for new drivers who take a safe-driver course, sometimes sponsored by the insurance company. This may mean attending an actual classroom driver’s education class, watching a driving video, or passing a written driving safety test. Your company may also offer discounts if the teen drives with devices that monitor driver behavior.

Cars for Teen Drivers

Given the cost of car insurance for your teen, you may want him driving a car this is cheap to buy and cheap to insure. Check out our list of the 20 best used cars for teens.

The least expensive cars to buy aren’t always the least expensive to insure. Some cars cost more to repair after an accident, and some have a record of more injury claims than others do. And the least expensive car to insure may not be the safest. Electronic equipment such as stability control and antilock brakes can help novice drivers avoid accidents, and there can be a discount for having them. The lowest car insurance rates are often given to drivers with minivans and small SUVs.

Insurance for College Students

When a teen moves out to go to college, you’ve got another car insurance decision to make, based on whether the teen owns a car, how far he moves, if he’s going to drive a family car while in town, etc. Read our guide to car insurance for college students to get guidance for your unique case.

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Aig car insurance uk saga Jun 6, 2013

Florida May Scrap No-Fault Auto Insurance Law

Frustrated by a recent court decision temporarily blocking part of Florida’s no-fault auto insurance law reformed last year, state lawmakers are considering scrapping the entire law. Current proposals would reinstate to a tort system and mandate that all drivers purchase bodily injury coverage.

Florida Second Judicial Circuit Court Judge Terry Lewis recently issued a temporary injunction against parts of last year’s personal injury protection (PIP) reforms that limit medical benefits for non-emergency injuries and exclude acupuncturists and massage therapists from treating accident victims.

“If you have been here very long at all we have dealt with this issue every four or five yearswith the view that next time there ain’t going to be any next time,” said Simmons, adding that last year’s reforms were “as good a solution as possible for a system that is bleeding profusely.”Nfu scotland car insurance

Simmons is proposing that the current no-fault law that calls for drivers to carry $10,000 in PIP coverage be replaced by one that calls for drivers to have $10,000 in property damage and $25,000 in bodily injury coverage per person for a total of $50,000 per occurrence.

Insurance representatives offered tentative support but expressed concerns over pricing and the possible consequences of moving to a tort system.

Michael Carlson, executive director of the Personal Injury Federation of Florida that represents State Farm, Allstate and Progressive, said he still supports last year’s reform effort. However, he said, given the legal challenges and other obstacles to reducing costs it may be time to scrap the PIP system.

“After decades of trying to reform PIP, to drive out the fraud and hold down costs, we may have hit a point of impasse,” said Carlson.

Carlson did suggest to lawmakers that if they press forward with mandatory bodily injury coverage they should allow drivers to purchase a lower level of coverage such as $10,000 per person and $20,000 per occurrence. He said that would allow more flexibility in pricing.

“Let the marketplace speak and let consumers make decisions so we can know what the pricing point should be,” said Carlson.

Medical providers, however, cautioned lawmakers that if they abandon PIP they should require some medical payment coverage to offset the costs of serious injuries.

Florida Hospital Association representative Bill Bell said that 418,000 accident victims are treated in emergency rooms each year and of those 30 percent to 40 percent only have PIP coverage. He said moving to a no-fault system could seriously strain hospitals’ resources since they may have to wait months to be paid.

“If the at-fault driver is not covered there are delays in payment from when doctors treat injuries to when there might be a settlement,” said Bell.

Insurance representatives also said that the repeal of PIP should be accompanied by changes in the state’s bad faith law. Under current law, if an individual disputes a claim, an insurer has 60 days to either pay the claim, resolve the dispute or be open to a bad faith claim. At a minimum, insurers said the same law should be applied to third-party claims.

Florida Association of Justice General Counsel Paul Jess, representing trial lawyers, disputed the argument. He said moving to a tort system does not necessarily mean there will be a flood of bad faith claims.

“We don’t think there is a problem under the current law that needs to be fixed and we don’t think a switch to bodily injury would cause a problem to be fixed,” said Jess.

Despite the concerns over the PIP law, statistics gathered by the Office of Insurance Regulation show that last year’s reforms have indeed lowered PIP rates since they took effect in July 2012.

Looking at the top 25 personal injury auto insurers that represent 80 percent of the market, 10 insurers that represent 42 percent of the market have decreased their PIP rates by at least 10 percent. Another four insurers decreased their rates by less than 10 percent while 7 percent filed for increases.

With the exception of State Farm Mutual — which lowered its PIP rate indication from plus 22 percent to plus 7.9 percent — the other largest insurers in the state filed for decreases in PIP rates. Geico General Insurance Co., Geico Indemnity Co., Progressive American Insurance Co., and Progressive Select Insurance Co., all filed for a 10 percent decrease in their PIP rates.

OIR Director of Property and Casualty Product Review Sandra Starnes said that it is difficult to estimate the impact of eliminating PIP because drivers purchase various amounts of coverage. She added, however, that most drivers already carry bodily injury coverage.

“It appears 90 percent of policies in Florida have bodily injury on them,” said Starnes.

Starnes told lawmakers that based on an analysis of three large non-standard insurers and two standard insurers, if the mandatory bodily limits were set at $10,000 per person and $20,000 per occurrence, non-standard insurers would see rate decreases throughout the state. Standard insurers would only see rate decreases in areas where PIP fraud is prevalent.

If those limits were increased to $25,000 per person and $50,000 per occurrence both the standard and non-standard insurers would only see rate decreases in central Miami, Starnes said.

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