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Minimum car insurance coverage in north carolina

Remember that there are other ways to save money and get more discounts on your car insurance, if you make sure you get all the discounts you are entitled to, and buy your insurance from a good car insurance company then you can afford more than the state minimum insurance.

What Do the Numbers Mean in the Minimum State Car Insurance Coverages?

Let us look at an example:

If your state minimum insurance requirements are 25/50/20. 

The first two numbers refer to bodily injury liability limits and the third number refers to the property damage liability limit.

The first two numbers in 25/50/20 mean that in an accident each person injured would receive a maximum of up to $25,000 with a maximum limit of $50,000 per accident.

To understand this better, imagine if two people needed $25,000, then the maximum of $50,000 per accident would be sufficient. However, what of three people were injured, needing $25,000 each. The minimum would not be sufficient. In a case like this, you could end up in a difficult situation where whoever files first could get first access to the $50,000 limit and you may be sued for the rest if the accident was your fault.

The last number refers to the total coverage per accident for property damage, which in this case would be $20,000.

Imagine if you hit the side of a house, or an electrical pole, and the resulting damage exceeded $20,000. In this scenario, the minimum car insurance requirement might fall short and you could be sued for the difference.

Minimum Car Insurance Limits May Not Be Enough to Protect You

It is easy to see how these limits may not cover all the liability and property damage needs. Now that you understand what the numbers mean, check the listing of each state's minimum insurance requirements. Look up the state you live in to see if you feel comfortable with the minimum numbers.

It does not cost much more to raise your car insurance limits. Make sure you are adequately protected by contacting your insurance agent to discuss your options, choose a good car insurance company for your area, and find ways to save money on your auto insurance without putting your financial future at risk. 

Full List of Minimum Car Insurance Required by Law in Your State and Exceptions

Alabama 

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person

$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$25,000 property damage liability per accident

Alaska 

$50,000 bodily injury liability per person
$100,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$25,000 property damage liability per accident

Arizona

Arizona has a special condition around legal requirements to drive your car. All drivers must show financial responsibility. You do not have to have insurance, however, if you choose to not purchase insurance you will have to be ready to put up a $40,000 bond to prove you can pay for damages resulting from an accident. Naturally, for most people, buying the minimum car insurance makes a lot more financial sense. Here are the Arizona minimum requirements if you choose to purchase insurance instead of put up a bond:

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$25,000 property damage liability per accident

Arkansas

$15,000 bodily injury liability per person
$30,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$10,000 property damage liability per accident

California

$15,000 bodily injury liability per person
$30,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$5,000 property damage liability per accident

Colorado

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$15,000 property damage liability per accident

Connecticut

$20,000 bodily injury liability per person
$40,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$10,000 property damage liability per accident
$20,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage per person
$40,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage per accident

Delaware

$15,000 bodily injury liability per person
$30,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$10,000 property damage liability per accident

Florida

$10,000 property damage liability per accident
$10,000 personal injury protection

Georgia

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$25,000 property damage liability per accident

Hawaii

$20,000 bodily injury liability per person
$40,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$10,000 property damage liability per accident
$10,000 personal injury protection

Idaho

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$15,000 property damage liability per accident

Illinois

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$20,000 property damage liability per accident
$25,000 uninsured motorist coverage per person
$50,000 uninsured motorist coverage per accident

Indiana

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$10,000 property damage liability per accident

Iowa

$20,000 bodily injury liability per person
$40,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$15,000 property damage liability per accident

Kansas

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$10,000 property damage liability per accident
$25,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage per person
$50,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage per accident
Personal injury protection ( $4,500 in medical expenses, up to $900 per month for disability or loss of income, $25 per day for in-home services,$4,500 for rehabilitation, $2,000 for funeral burial or cremation costs)

Kentucky

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$10,000 property damage liability per accident
$10,000 personal injury protection

Louisiana

$15,000 bodily injury liability per person
$30,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$25,000 property damage liability per accident

Maine

$50,000 bodily injury liability per person
$100,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$25,000 property damage liability per accident
$50,000 uninsured motorist coverage per person
$100,000 uninsured motorist coverage per accident
$2,000 medical payments coverage

Maryland

$30,000 bodily injury liability per person
$60,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$15,000 property damage liability per accident

Massachusetts

$20,000 bodily injury liability per person
$40,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$5,000 property damage liability per accident
$20,000 uninsured motorist coverage per person
$40,000 uninsured motorist coverage per accident
$8,000 personal injury protection

Michigan

$20,000 bodily injury liability per person
$40,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$10,000 property damage liability per accident
Personal injury protection (unlimited) Michigan offers no-fault insurance with mandatory coverages 
$1 million property protection (PPI). PPI pays up to $1 million for damage your vehicle does in Michigan to other people's property, such as buildings and fences.

Minnesota

$30,000 bodily injury liability per person
$60,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$10,000 property damage liability per accident
$25,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage per person
$50,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage per accident
$40,000 personal injury protection

Mississippi

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$25,000 property damage liability per accident

Missouri

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$10,000 property damage liability per accident
$25,000 uninsured motorist coverage per person
$50,000 uninsured motorist coverage per accident

Montana

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$10,000 property damage liability per accident

Nebraska

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$25,000 property damage liability per accident
$25,000 uninsured motorist coverage per person
$50,000 uninsured motorist coverage per accident

Nevada

$15,000 bodily injury liability per person
$30,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$10,000 property damage liability per accident

New Hampshire

Car insurance is not mandatory in New Hampshire. There is no minimum car insurance requirement for the State of New Hampshire, however, state law does require you to pay for any bodily injury or property damage arising from your operation of a vehicle that you own.

So, although there is no law forcing you to purchase auto insurance in New Hampshire, there is a law which will hold you responsible for paying for damages. You should purchase at least the minimum car insurance to protect yourself and your family.

These are the minimum car insurance limits available when you do decide to purchase insurance:

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$25,000 property damage liability per accident
$25,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage per person
$50,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage per accident
$25,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist property damage coverage
$1,000 medical payments coverage

New Jersey

$15,000 bodily injury liability per person
$30,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$5,000 property damage liability per accident
$15,000 personal injury protection

New Mexico

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$10,000 property damage liability per accident

New York

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$50,000 liability for death per person
$100,000 liability for death per accident
$10,000 property damage liability per accident
$50,000 personal injury protection
$25,000 uninsured motorist coverage per person
$50,000 uninsured motorist coverage per accident

North Carolina

$30,000 bodily injury liability per person
$60,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$25,000 property damage liability per accident
$30,000 uninsured motorist coverage per person
$60,000 uninsured motorist coverage per accident
$25,000 uninsured motorist property damage coverage per accident

North Dakota

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$25,000 property damage liability per accident
$25,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage per person
$50,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage per accident
$30,000 personal injury protection

Ohio

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$25,000 property damage liability per accident

Oklahoma

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$25,000 property damage liability per accident

Oregon

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$20,000 property damage liability per accident
$25,000 uninsured motorist coverage per person
$50,000 uninsured motorist coverage per accident
$15,000 personal injury protection

Pennsylvania

$15,000 bodily injury liability per person
$30,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$5,000 property damage liability per accident
$5,000 medical benefits

Rhode Island

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$25,000 property damage liability per accident

South Carolina

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$25,000 property damage liability per accident
$25,000 uninsured motorist coverage per person
$50,000 uninsured motorist coverage per accident
$25,000 uninsured motorist property damage coverage

South Dakota

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$25,000 property damage liability per accident
$25,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage per person
$50,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage per accident

Tennessee

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$15,000 property damage liability per accident

Texas

$30,000 bodily injury liability per person
$60,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$25,000 property damage liability per accident

Utah

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$65,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$15,000 property damage liability per accident
$3,000 personal injury protection

Virginia

Virgina has special conditions around car insurance. You do not necessarily have to buy car insurance, according to the DMV, Virginia law requires that all drivers have a way to pay for injuries or property damage resulting from a car accident. Minimum car insurance is one way to meet this requirement. These are the Virginia minimums:

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$20,000 property damage liability per accident

Vermont

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$10,000 property damage liability per accident
$50,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage per person
$100,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage per accident
$10,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist property damage coverage per accident

Washington

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$10,000 property damage liability per accident

Washington D.C.

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$10,000 property damage liability per accident
$25,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage per person
$50,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage per accident
$5,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist property damage coverage per accident

West Virginia

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$25,000 property damage liability per accident
$25,000 uninsured motorist coverage per person
$50,000 uninsured motorist coverage per accident
$25,000 uninsured motorist property damage coverage

Wisconsin

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$10,000 property damage liability per accident
$25,000 uninsured motorist coverage per person
$50,000 uninsured motorist coverage per accident

Wyoming

$25,000 bodily injury liability per person
$50,000 bodily injury liability per accident
$20,000 property damage liability per accident 

Source


South Carolina Car Insurance

Car insurance is mandatory in South Carolina. Drivers must have liability insurance, and any claims you make are subject to reduction if you are found to have contributed to the accident.

Read below for more details about required and optional car insurance coverages, regulations, and rates.

Required Car Insurance in SC

South Carolina auto insurance laws mandate that you hold at least the minimum required amounts of both:

  • Liability coverage.
  • Uninsured motorist coverage.

Liability Coverage in SC

Liability insurance pays for damages/losses and injuries to the other party if you cause an accident.

In SC, you must have the following minimum liability coverage:

  • $25,000 for bodily injury or death per person.
  • $50,000 total for bodily injury or death per accident.
  • $25,000 for property damage.

You can opt to buy additional coverage from licensed South Carolina car insurance companies.

Uninsured Motorist Coverage

Uninsured motorist insurance pays for the damages/losses and injuries that you suffer if you are in an accident caused by driver who does not have car insurance.

NOTE: A registered uninsured driver who causes an accident must pay for damage or medical costs out of pocket. This type of uninsured driver is not covered by uninsured motorist coverage.

In South Carolina, you must have the following minimum uninsured motorist coverage:

  • $25,000 for property damage.
  • $25,000 for bodily injury or death per person.
  • $50,000 for bodily injury or death per accident.

You can always opt for higher limits if you want more coverage.

Other SC Car Insurance Options

For additional protection, you can elect to buy other types of coverage from your agent.

If you elect not to have car insurance, you can register as an uninsured motorist with the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV).

Additional Car Insurance

Optional coverage types help pay costs not paid for by liability or uninsured motorist coverage. They include:

  • Collision coverage: Pays for accident-related damages to your car.
  • Comprehensive coverage: Pays for damage to your car caused by external factors like weather, theft, or wildlife.
  • Medical payments coverage: Pays for medical expenses if they exceed the limits of other coverage.
  • Rental reimbursement coverage: Pays for a rental car if you need one after an accident.
  • Towing and labor coverage: Pays for towing and some repair costs.

NOTE: If you finance or lease a vehicle, your lender may require you to buy collision and/or comprehensive coverage.

Uninsured Motorist Registration

South Carolina offers drivers the option of registering with the DMV as an uninsured motorist for an annual fee of $550.

NOTE: If you register as an uninsured motorist, you are liable for any damages or losses that are your fault.

To register as an uninsured motorist, you must meet certain qualifications:

  • You have held a valid driver's license for at least 3 years.
  • Every other driver in your household has held a valid driver's license for at least 3 years.
  • You are not currently required to have SR22 certification.
  • You have not had been convicted of certain violations in at least 3 years. The SC DMV provides a full list of violations, but some of the most common are:
    • DUI.
    • Reckless driving.
    • Failing to stop for a school bus, signal, or police officer.
    • Specific moving violations.
    • 2 accidents or more that cause over $600 in injury or $1,000 in property damage.

If you meet the registration qualifications and you wish to apply for uninsured motorist status, you must complete the Application for Uninsured Motorist Registration (FR-510).

NOTE: If you are convicted of a violation or if someone who has been licensed for less than 3 years joins your household, your uninsured motorist status will be revoked and you will have to buy car insurance.

Proof of Car Insurance in SC

You must show proof of insurance if you are stopped by a police officer or involved in a car accident.

If you are a registered uninsured motorist, you can show your copy of your approved application.

Traffic Stops

If you do not have proof of your South Carolina car insurance during a stop, you can be given a ticket and face a fine or imprisonment.

Once the citation is issued, you must provide proof of insurance to the SCDMV within 30 days, or your driver's license can be suspended.

Car Accidents

If you are involved in a car accident and do not have proof of insurance, a responding officer may issue you a Notice of Requirement (FR-10), which requires you to prove that you were properly insured or registered as an uninsured motorist in any car accident involving:

  • Injury.
  • Death.
  • Property damage.

Your Notice of Requirement form must be completed by your auto insurance carrier and submitted to the DMV within 15 days of the accident, or your driver's license and vehicle registration can be suspended.

NOTE: If you are a registered uninsured motorist, attach a statement to the FR-10 that states you are registered as uninsured with the South Carolina DMV and return it to the address on the form.

Vehicle Registration

You must have valid South Carolina car insurance to register your car in South Carolina. The DMV will verify your coverage electronically when you give them the name of your insurer, so you do not need to show proof of insurance.

The SCDMV is notified when a policy is canceled or suspended. You will be notified if your policy is no longer valid.

Insurance policies can be canceled:

  • At any time if you have not paid your premium.
  • For any reason 61 to 90 days into a new policy.

If you receive a notice that your insurance has been canceled, you must update the SCDMV with your valid, current insurance information within 20 business days to avoid suspension of your driving privileges.

If you do not have valid auto insurance, your driver's license and vehicle registration will be suspended and you may have to pay reinstatement fees:

  • $200 to have your driver's license and vehicle registration reinstated.
  • An additional $5 per day that you were not insured (up to $400).

Alternative Insurance for High-Risk Drivers

If you have violations on your driving record, you may be subject to additional car insurance requirements and may have difficulty finding an insurance provider.

If you have been unable to find a South Carolina car insurance carrier who will accept you, you can contact the Associated Auto Insurers Plan of South Carolina (AAIPSC) to request coverage. Your request must certify that you've tried to get insurance and were rejected in the previous 60 days.

The AAIPSC assigns drivers to a licensed SC insurance company. That company is required to provide insurance to a driver assigned by the AAIPSC.

Contact the AAIPSC by phone at (866) 560-4100 for more information.

Insurance Penalties: SR-22

SR-22 forms, also referred to as SR22 insurance, is a form filed by your car insurance company that guarantees you will maintain coverage for a specific period of time.

In South Carolina, an SR-22 is required to have your license reinstated after any of these violations:

  • Any DUI offense.
  • Driving with a suspended license.
  • Driving a car without insurance or without registering as an uninsured driver.
  • Failing to have a valid SR-22 in place (if required).

The length of time you must have the SR22 varies depending on the type of offense and the number of offenses you have.

SC Insurance Regulation

The South Carolina Department of Insurance (SCDOI) regulates the insurance industry in the state. The SCDOI is responsible for applying and enforcing insurance laws and providing insurance information to the public.

Insurance Fraud

The South Carolina Attorney General's Office handles insurance fraud complaints and investigations.

Car insurance fraud can include:

  • Falsified documents.
  • Making up injuries or damages.
  • Staging a car accident.
  • Giving inaccurate information to get car insurance.

Fraud is illegal and contributes to higher insurance rates.

You can report suspected fraud to the SC Attorney General's Office:

  • By phone at (888) 95-FRAUD. ((888)-953-7283)
  • Online by completing the Insurance Fraud Complaint Form.

Insurance Questions

The SCDOI can answer your insurance questions and help resolve complaints.

If you have a question or complaint about your rates, a claim, an agent, your car insurance company, or other auto insurance topics, you can submit the Consumer Complaint Form online.

Determining Your Car Insurance Rate

South Carolina car insurance rates are based on many factors, which may include your:

  • Driving record.
  • Age and gender.
  • Marital status.
  • Geographic area.
  • Past insurance.
  • Credit report.

They may also factor in information about your car:

  • How it is used.
  • The make and model.
  • Safety and/or anti-theft features.

Your deductibles, the out-of-pocket costs you pay if a claim is made against your insurance, also affect your auto insurance rates. The higher your deductible, the lower your premium.

SC Car Insurance Discounts

When shopping for car insurance quotes, be sure to ask your agent about discounts that may apply to you.

Specific discounts may be available for:

  • Insuring multiple vehicles.
  • Buying multiple policies (like home and auto).
  • Safety devices, such as airbags.
  • Anti-theft devices, such as alarm systems.
  • A good driving record.
  • Low mileage on your vehicle.

In addition, teen drivers may qualify for discounts that can help make their rates more affordable, including discounts for:

  • Taking a driver's education course.
  • Being a good student.

To make sure you get the lowest car insurance rate available, be sure to compare rates from different South Carolina car insurance companies, ask about discounts, and maintain a good driving record.

Most Stolen Cars in South Carolina

If you drive a car that is a known target for theft you will likely face increased car insurance rates.

The following is a list of 2013's most stolen cars in South Carolina according to www.nicb.org:

  1. Honda Accord.
  2. Ford Pickup (Full Size).
  3. Chevrolet Pickup (Full Size).
  4. Ford Explorer.
  5. Chevrolet Pickup.
  6. Toyota Camry.
  7. Ford Crown Victoria.
  8. Dodge Pickup (Full Size).
  9. Jeep Cherokee/Grand Cherokee.
  10. Chevrolet Impala.

Source


To drive legally in nearly every state you must carry liability car insurance. Liability coverage kicks in if you're at fault for an accident and you hurt someone or damage someone's property. It has two parts:

  • bodily injury liability (BI), which pays for injuries to others
  • property damage liability (PD), which pays for damage to someone else’s car or property

Each state requires you to have a minimum level of liability coverage, though you can buy more to ensure you’re fully protected if you cause an accident. In many cases, raising your liability limits is strongly encouraged. Liability insurance is commonly shown in the following format: 20/40/10. The first two numbers refer to bodily injury liability limits and the third number to property damage liability. In this example, 20/40/10 means coverage up to $20,000 for each person injured in an accident, up to a maximum of $40,000 for the entire accident, and $10,000 worth of coverage for property damage.

Liability insurance doesn't cover your own injuries or damage to your own property.

In some states, other coverages are required in addition to liability. These may include personal injury protection (PIP), uninsured motorist coverage (UM) and underinsured motorist coverage (UIM).

Minimum liability car insurance requirements by state

State Minimum car insurance limits
Alabama Liability: 25/50/25
Alaska Liability: 50/100/25
Arizona Liability: 15/30/10
Arkansas Liability: 25/50/25
California Liability: 15/30/5
Colorado Liability: 25/50/15
Connecticut Liability: 20/40/10
UM/UIM BI: 20/40
Delaware Liability: 15/30/10
PIP: 15/30
District of Columbia Liability: 25/50/10
UM BI: 25/50
UMPD: $5,000
Florida

Liability: 10/20/10
PIP: $10,000
BI liability not required by Florida but many carriers require 10/20

Georgia Liability: 25/50/25
Hawaii Liability: 20/40/10
PIP or PPO: $10,000
Idaho Liability: 25/50/15
Illinois Liability: 25/50/20
UM BI: 25/50
Indiana Liability: 25/50/10
Iowa Liability: 20/40/15
Kansas Liability: 25/50/25
UM/UIM BI: 25/50
PIP: $4,500 medical/$900 work loss
Kentucky Liability: 25/50/10
PIP: $10,000
Louisiana Liability: 15/30/25
Maine Liability: 50/100/25
UM/UIM BI: 50/100
Medical payments: $2,000
Maryland Liability: 30/60/15
UM/UIM BI: 30/60
UMPD: $15,000
PIP $2,500
Massachusetts Liability: 20/40/5
UM/UIM BI: 20/40
PIP: $8,000
Michigan Liability: 20/40/10
PIP: Medical and work loss
PPI: $1,000,000
Minnesota Liability: 30/60/10
UM/UIM BI: 25/50
PIP: $40,000
Mississippi Liability: 25/50/25
Missouri Liability: 25/50/10
UM BI: 25/50
Montana Liability: 25/50/20
Nebraska Liability: 25/50/25
UM/UIM BI: 25/50
Nevada Liability: 15/30/10
New Hampshire* Liability: 25/50/25
UM/UIM BI: 25/50
Medical payments: $1,000
*Insurance not mandatory in New Hampshire
New Jersey Liability: 15/30/5 (standard policy)
UM/UIM BI: 15/30
UMPD: $5,000
PIP: $15,000
New Mexico Liability: 25/50/10
New York Liability: 25/50/10
UM BI: 25/50
PIP: $50,000
North Carolina Liability: 30/60/25
UM BI: 30/60
UMPD: $25,000
North Dakota Liability: 25/50/25
UM/UIM BI: 25/50
PIP: $30,000
Ohio Liability: 25/50/25
Oklahoma Liability: 25/50/25
Oregon Liability: 25/50/20
UM BI: 25/50
PIP: $15,000
Pennsylania Liability: 15/30/5
First party benefits (PIP): $5,000
Rhode Island Liability: 25/50/25
South Carolina Liability: 25/50/25
UM BI: 25/50
UMPD: $25,000
South Dakota Liability: 25/50/25
UM/UIM BI: 25/50
Tennessee Liability: 25/50/15
Texas Liability: 30/60/25
Utah Liability: 25/65/15
PIP: $3,000
Vermont Liability: 25/50/10
UM/UIM BI: 50/100
UMPD: $10,000
Virginia Liability: 25/50/20
UM/UIM BI: 25/50
UMPD: $20,000
Washington Liability: 25/50/10
West Virginia Liability: 25/50/25
UM BI: 25/50
UMPD: $25,000
Wisconsin Liability: 25/50/10
UM BI: 25/50
Wyoming Liability: 25/50/20

Source: Property Casualty Insurers Association of America and Insurance Information Institute; state departments of insurance and motor vehicles.

Key to acronyms:

  • UM: Uninsured motorist coverage
  • UIM: Underinsured motorist coverage
  • UM BI: Uninsured motorist bodily injury coverage
  • UMPD: Uninsured motorist property damage coverage
  • PIP: Personal injury protection
  • PPI: Property protection insurance (applies only to Michigan)
  • BI liability: Bodily injury liability

How much does minimum liability car insurance cost?

Below you'll see average rates by state for minimum liability levels of coverage. Enter your state in the search field in the chart below to find out what you can expect to pay. Even with bare-bones coverage, you can still save on car insurance by comparing rates. The difference between the highest and lowest rate fielded from major insurers can vary by hundreds --sometimes thousands -- of dollars.

StateAverage annual rateHighest rateLowest rate
Alaska $318 $699 $188
Alabama $419 $718 $252
Arkansas $397 $677 $211
Arizona $496 $893 $249
California $491 $1,364 $133
Colorado $506 $992 $228
Connecticut $761 $1,520 $382
DC $745 $953 $344
Delaware $805 $1,251 $440
Florida $884 $5,872 $296
Georgia $532 $1,275 $204
Hawaii $555 $862 $230
Iowa $294 $490 $178
Idaho $319 $572 $194
Illinois $383 $1,009 $154
Indiana $400 $834 $259
Kansas $397 $832 $182
Kentucky $745 $1,415 $242
Louisiana $705 $1,359 $371
Massachusetts $539 $1,598 $199
Maryland $710 $1,585 $394
Maine $359 $543 $187
Michigan $2,012 $18,841 $425
Minnesota $579 $1,502 $306
Missouri $409 $961 $236
Mississippi $398 $737 $189
Montana $323 $628 $151
North Carolina $347 $631 $148
North Dakota $363 $705 $255
Nebraska $329 $694 $185
New Hampshire $485 $1,176 $208
New Jersey $677 $1,367 $292
New Mexico $424 $800 $244
Nevada $623 $1,288 $262
New York $812 $4,682 $242
Ohio $383 $857 $178
Oklahoma $444 $859 $231
Oregon $690 $1,268 $330
Pennsylvania $480 $1,838 $194
Rhode Island $751 $1,820 $332
South Carolina $484 $739 $293
South Dakota $267 $445 $154
Tennessee $404 $912 $194
Texas $465 $1,042 $243
Utah $531 $896 $287
Virginia $372 $750 $218
Vermont $337 $471 $157
Washington $466 $959 $227
Wisconsin $373 $1,067 $181
West Virginia $493 $780 $251
Wyoming $339 $581 $167

* Methodology:

CarInsurance.com commissioned Quadrant Information Services to provide a report of average auto insurance rates for a 2016 Honda Accord for nearly every ZIP code in the United States. We calculated rates using data for up to six large carriers (Allstate, Farmers, GEICO, Nationwide, Progressive and State Farm) for each state.

Averages are based on insurance for a single 40-year-old male who commutes 12 miles to work each day, with policy limits of 100/300/100 ($100,000 for injury liability for one person, $300,000 for all injuries and $100,000 for property damage in an accident) and a $500 deductible on collision and comprehensive coverage. This hypothetical driver has a clean record and good credit. The rate includes uninsured motorist coverage. Average rates are for comparative purposes. Your own rate will depend on your personal factors and vehicle.

Source

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