<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1700626273582757&ev=PageView&noscript=1" />

Temporary car insurance uk expats income

  • Pensions
  • Health Care
    • Private Health Care
    • Public Health Care

Pensions
There are 3 different types of pensions you may be entitled to. There are two pensions that are based on the amount of social insurance contributions you’ve paid, Retirement Pension and Old Age Contributory Pension. If you do not have enough contributions you may apply for the means tested Old Age Non-Contributory Pension.

What types of social insurance contributions are there?
Social insurance contributions fall into the four groups.

  • Full rate social insurance contributions are PRSI contributions at classes A, E, F, G, H and N or at ‘ordinary’ rate before 6 April 1979.
  • Modified rate social insurance contributions are PRSI contributions at classes B, C and D. This category also covers contributions for Widows and Orphans Pension known as the ‘WOPS’ rate before 6 April 1979. What is Retirement What is Retirement Pension? What is Retirement Pension? What is Retirement Pension? What is Retirement Pension? Pension?
  • Voluntary Contributions (VCs) are made by people under age 66 who are no longer covered by compulsory PRSI provided they satisfy certain conditions.
  • Credited contributions (‘credits’) are similar to the social insurance contributions you pay while employed and are usually awarded at the same rate as your last paid social insurance contribution. You may get credits when you are claiming a social welfare payment. Credits are not allowed after self-employed contributions (Class S).

What is Retirement Pension?
Retirement Pension is payable to people in Ireland aged 65 who have retired from work and who have enough social insurance contributions. It is not means tested. In general, you must have been an employee and paying full-rate social insurance contributions.
If you are self-employed you may also qualify. You should contact the Department of Social and Family Affairs for further information.

How do I qualify?
You must:

  • Be aged 65
  • Satisfy certain social insurance contributions
  • Be retired from full-time employment (you may earn up to €38 per week)

At age 66, you may transfer to the Old Age Contributory Pension (please read Factsheet 3-B)
if that would be to your advantage. Whether you transfer or not, the retirement condition ends
at 66. What this means is you cannot be employed or self-employed while receiving a

Retirement Pension before the age of 66, but, after that, you may earn an income from any
source.

back to top

How many social insurance contributions do I need?
You must have:

  • Started paying social insurance before reaching age 55
  • Paid at least 260 full rate employment contributions
  • A yearly average of at least 48 full rate contributions paid and/or credited from 1979 to the end of the tax year before you reach age 65
  • A yearly average of at least 24 full rate contributions paid or credited from 1953 (or the time you started insurable employment, if later) to the end of the tax year before you reach age 65

What if I paid my social insurance contributions abroad?
If you worked in a country covered by EC Regulations or a country with which Ireland has a Bilateral Social Security Agreement you may qualify for a pro-rata pension. This pension combines your Irish social insurance record and your social insurance record in the other country. You should contact the Department of Social and Family Affairs to find out how much you are entitled to.

What countries are covered by EC regulations?
Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, The Republic of Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The Netherlands, The UK

What countries are covered by the Bi-Lateral Social Security Agreement?
The countries are: Australia, Canada, Quebec, New Zealand, and The US. The Channel Islands and the Isle of Man are expected to sign an agreement in 2005.

How much am I entitled to?
You must contact your nearest social welfare office or the Department of Social and Family Affairs.

Am I entitled to any other payments?
You may qualify for the following payments if you are aged 66 or over:

  • Living Alone Allowance
  • Over 80 Allowance
  • Household Benefits Package
  • Free Travel

When should I apply?
You should apply 4 months before reaching the age of 65. If you worked in a country covered by EC Regulations or a country with which Ireland has a Bilateral Social Security Agreement you should apply 6 months before reaching pension age so that the other country or countries can decide on your application in time.

How do I apply?
You must complete Form RP/CP1. This is available from your local social welfare office or from the Department of Social and Family Affairs. You must send the RP/CP1 Form to the address clearly marked on the form.

What is Old Age Contributory Pension?
The Old Age Contributory Pension is payable to people in Ireland from the age of 66 who have enough social insurance contributions. It is not means tested and you may have income from any other source while receiving it. It is taxable.

back to top

How do I qualify?
You will qualify for Old Age Contributory Pension if:

  • You are aged 66 or over
  • You satisfy certain social insurance contributions.

How many social insurance contributions do I need?
You must have:

  • Started paying PRSI contributions before reaching the age of 56
  • At least 260 full rate employment contributions
  • A yearly average of at least 48 full rate contributions paid and/or credited from 1979 to the end of the tax year before you reach age 66
  • A yearly average of at least 10 full rate contributions paid or credited from 1953 (or the time you started insurable employment, if later) to the end of the tax year before you reach age 66

If you reach pension age on or after 6 April 2012

  • You must have at least 520 full-rate employment contributions paid
  • If you have paid at least 260 full-rate employment contributions, you can make up the balance of the required 520 with high or special rate Voluntary Contributions
  • Regarding the 260/520 contributions paid condition, there are special provisions for people who paid High Rate Voluntary Contributions on or before 6 April 1997
  • The Department of Social and Family Affairs recognises social insurance paid before 1953 under the National Health Insurance Acts. Please read Factsheet 3-C for more information on Pre-53 Pensions.
What if I paid my social insurance contributions abroad?
If you worked in a country covered by EC Regulations or a country with which Ireland has a Bilateral Social Security Agreement you may qualify for a pro-rata pension. This pension combines your Irish social insurance record and your social insurance record in the other country. You collect your pro-rata pension in the country you are resident in.

How do I qualify for a pro-rata pension?
To qualify, you must have at least:

  • 260 weeks full rate PRSI paid and
  • An average of at least 10 weeks social insurance paid or credited per year based on a combination of Irish social insurance and social insurance in a country covered by EC Regulations or a country with which Ireland has a bilateral relationship.

What countries are covered by EC regulations?
Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, The Republic of Cyprus (Cyprus South), Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland The Republic of Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The Netherlands, The UK

What countries are covered by the Bi-Lateral Social Security Agreement?
The countries are: Australia, Canada, Quebec, New Zealand, and The US. The Channel Islands and the Isle of Man are expected to sign an agreement in 2005.

Can I transfer my Old Age Contributory Pension from another country to Ireland?
Yes. You can transfer your Old Age Contributory Pension.

How much am I entitled to?
You must contact your local social welfare office to clarify exactly how much you may be entitled to. To find out the maximum amount you may be entitled to if you meet all the qualifying conditions, please read Factsheet 3-F

Am I entitled to any other payments?
You may also qualify for the following payments when aged 66 or over

  • Living Alone Allowance (Please see Factsheet 2-M)
  • Over 80 Allowance
  • Household Benefits Package (Please read Factsheet 2-K)
  • Free Travel (Please read Factsheet 2-L)

back to top


How do I check if I have enough social insurance contributions?
You should check your social insurance record with the PRSI Records Section in the Department of Social and Family Affairs. In order to check your social insurance record you will need your PPS number (formerly known as RSI number). If you cannot remember your PRSI number you should contact your nearest Social Welfare office or the Department of Social and Family Affairs.

When should I apply?
You should apply 3 months before reaching 66. You do not have to be retired from work to make your application. If you worked in a country covered by EC Regulations or a country with which Ireland has a Bilateral Social Security Agreement you should apply 6 months before reaching pension age so that the other country or countries can decide on your application in time.

How do I apply?
You must complete Form RP/CP1. This is available from your local social welfare office or from the Department of Social and Family Affairs. You must send the RP/CP1 Form to the address clearly marked on the form.

Where can I get more information?
If you would like more information you should contact your local social welfare office or the
Department of Social and Family Affairs. The Pension Services Office also has a Pensions Forecast unit which gives advice to people over 55 on the pension contributions they may need to make to ensure they get an Old Age Contributory Pension.

What if I do not qualify to an Old Age Contributory Pension?
If you do not qualify for an Old Age Contributory Pension, you can apply for an Old Age Non-Contributory Pension (Please read Factsheet 3-D for more information).

Before May 2000 only full contributions paid after 1953 were counted when the Pensions Office was calculating a person’s yearly average contributions to see what Contributory Pension they should receive. Any contributions they had made before 1953 were not considered. ‘Pre 53’ contributions mean contributions made before January 1953 in the case of a man and before July 1953 in the case of a woman. This changed in May 2003 when a special Pre-53 Pension was introduced.

How did this change?
In May 2000 a special ‘partial’ Old Age Contributory Pension was introduced to give recognition to full contributions paid prior to 1953. The Pre-53 Pension recognises contributions made before 1953. The pension is paid to persons aged over 66 years who have full rate contributions paid before 1953 and who have at least 5 years (or 260) full rate contributions paid. Every two full rate contributions paid before 1953 are counted as three contributions for the purpose of qualifying for this pension. Credited contributions are not reckonable for this pension. They must be paid contributions.

How much am I entitled to?
The Pre-53 Pension is paid at a fixed rate, i.e. 50% of the maximum rate of the standard Old Age Contributory Pension. If you qualify for a Pre-53 Pension, regardless of whether you have 260 or 500 full rate contributions paid, you will receive 50% of the maximum rate of the Standard Old Age Contributory Pension. Qualified adults (i.e. an adult dependant) are also paid 50% of the maximum rate.


How are the Pre-53 contributions calculated?
If you have paid contributions (including at least one pre-53 contribution) that amount to or exceed 260 you satisfy the condition that requires that at least 5 years (or 260) full rate contributions paid.

EXAMPLES

A person with 173 Pre-53 full contributions

Actual number of pre 1953 contributions 173
Number of pre 1953 contributions taking ‘3 for 2’ rule into account (173 divided by 2 and multiplied by 3) 259.5
Number of contributions after 1953 0
Total contributions paid 260
(Fractions are rounded up to the next number)
OR
A person with 4 ‘Pre-53’ and 321 ‘Post-53’ full contributions
Actual number of pre 1953 contributions 4
Number of pre 1953 contributions taking ‘3 for 2’ rule into account (4 divided by 2 and multiplied by 3) 6
Number of contributions after 1953 321
Total contributions paid 327


What happens if I don’t have the full 260 contributions?
If, even having been given 3 for 2, your contributions do not add up to the 260 then you do not qualify for a pre-53 pension. Someone with 259 will not qualify because there is no room for discretion.

So are my Pre-53 contributions worthless?
No, they are not worthless. If you do not qualify for this pension based on your Irish Social Insurance contributions you may qualify for a smaller EU Pro-rata Pre-53 pension based on a combination of Irish contributions and contributions paid in another EU country or a country with which Ireland has a Bilateral Social Security Agreement. A minimum of 260 contributions are needed for this pension. You would also need a minimum of 52 full rate Irish contributions. Every two full rate Irish contributions paid before 1953 are counted as 3 contributions. The remainder can be made up of reckonable foreign contributions.
There are different rates of payment depending on the combination of Irish and foreign contributions.


I worked and paid contributions in Ireland for more than five years yet the Pensions Office tell me I do not have enough contributions. How can this be?
If you paid modified or reduced rate contributions they will not be counted for this pension. The reason for this was that there was already adequate occupational cover provided by the employer for those who paid reduced rate contributions.

What types of employment were not insurable?
If you were in any of the following areas, they were generally considered uninsurable:

  • If you worked less than 18 hours a week
  • If you were employed as a ‘casual’ worker
  • If you worked in another job other than your main employment. For example, if you worked but you also were self employed (e.g. a farmer). [Self-employment was not insurable until April 1988. If it were considered that a person was self-employed, no stamps would have been due. Members of a family business, such as a farm, were not liable to pay social insurance until 1988]
  • If your income was over the insurable limit. Before April 1974 social insurance was compulsory for manual workers regardless of their income. However, in the case of non-manual workers, social insurance was only compulsory if their income was below a set amount, known as the insurable limit or the earnings limit. This limit was increased from time to time and, as a result, some people found themselves intermittently in and out of insurance, thus causing gaps in their insurance record. A non-manual worker whose earnings were over the limit would be exempt from paying social insurance.

The earnings limit were:

Date from Date to Earnings Limit
5 January 1953 28 December 1958 £600 per year
29 December 1958 5 September 1965 £800 per year
6 September 1965 2 May 1971 £1,200 per year
3 May 1971 31 March 1974 £1,600 per year
1 April 1974 ABOLISHED


In some cases, you may believe that you paid social insurance in good faith but these contributions were not registered. However, if you can provide documentary evidence that you were in insurable employment, such as an old stamped insurance card/number, corroboration from witnesses or work references, the Pension Services office would review your entitlement. In some circumstances, they would request that a Social Welfare Inspector investigate the case with a view to establishing whether replacement contributions are due for the period in question.

Can I appeal a decision not to grant me a Pre-53 Pension?
You can appeal the decision and if you are still not satisfied you can go before a tribunal.

back to top


What is Old Age Non-Contributory Pension?
Old Age Non-Contributory Pension is a means-tested payment for people aged 66 or over who do not qualify for Retirement Pension or Old Age Contributory Pension based on their social insurance record.

How do I qualify?
To qualify you must:

  • Satisfy the Habitual Residence Condition (Please read Factsheet 2-A)
  • Be age 66 or over
  • Live in the State
  • Have a valid Personal Public Service Number (PPS No.) (Formerly called RSI)
  • Satisfy a means test


What is the means test?
A means test is a way of checking if you (and/or your spouse) have enough income to support yourself and what amount of payment, if any, you may qualify for. The following are the main items taken into account for the means test:

  • All cash income, including most social welfare and Health Centre payments, except Child Benefit, Domiciliary Care Allowance and Blind Welfare Allowance
  • The value of any benefit or privilege, for example, free board and lodging.
  • The value of investments, savings or property (but not the value of your own home)

Can I transfer my Old Age Non-Contributory Pension?
No. It is not possible to transfer Old Age Non-Contributory Pension.

What happens if I sell my house?
If you are living in accommodation that no longer suits you or that is too difficult for you to maintain, you may sell your house and move to more suitable accommodation. In certain cases, the Department of Social and Family Affairs may ignore the proceeds of the sale of your house, up to a limit of €190,500 when they assess your means.

How much am I entitled to?
To find out how much you are entitled to, you should contact the Department of Social and Family Affairs or your nearest Social Welfare Office. To find out the maximum amount you may be entitled to if you meet all the qualifying conditions, please read Factsheet 3-F.


Am I entitled to any other payments?
If you are 66 or over and living in the State, you are entitled to

  • Free Travel Pass (Please read Factsheet 2-L) You may also qualify for:
  • Household Benefits Package (Please read Factsheet 2-K)
  • Medical Card (Please read Factsheet 4)


When should I apply?
You should apply at least 3 months before reaching the age of 66.

How do I apply?
You must complete Form OAP1 and return it to the address clearly marked on the form. The forms are available from your local post office, social welfare office or the Department of Social and Family Affairs.

What do I need to provide?
You must send the following original documents (no photocopies):

  • Your birth certificate (long version only)
  • Your spouse or partner's birth certificate
  • Your marriage certificate
  • Your dependent child(ren)'s birth certificate(s). (If you are getting Child Benefit you do not need to send us their birth certificate(s))

What is PRSA?
PRSA (Personal Retirement Savings Account) are generally low-cost, easy-access private pension savings accounts. They are designed to allow you save for retirement. You are entitled to invest in a PRSA regardless of your employment status. PRSAs are transferable from job to job and they available from a variety of providers.

What types of PRSAs are available?
There are two types of PRSA: a Standard PRSA and a non-Standard PRSA.

What is the difference between a Standard PRSA and a non-Standard PRSA?
The main differences between both types are the charges and investment options. If you have a Standard PRSA:

  • You cannot be charged more than 5% on the contributions you pay and 1% a year on the managed funds. (Your PRSA provider can charge as little or as much as it likes, up to these maximum levels.)
  • You can only invest in pooled funds, except for temporary cash holdings
  • You do not have to buy another product, such as life assurance, when you are applying for your Standard PRSA. (A Standard PRSA may not be marketed or sold if the purchase of the product is conditional on some other product being purchased).

If you have a non-Standard PRSA:
There is no limit on charges and you can invest in a range of funds including (but not restricted to) pooled funds.

What are pooled funds?
Pooled funds are a collective investment scheme where your money is pooled to buy assets including Government bonds, deposits, property, and stocks.

back to top

What are temporary cash holdings?
Temporary cash holdings are short-term deposits which provide a secure income. Who are PRSA providers?
  • Ark Life Assurance Co. Ltd
  • Canada Life Assurance (Ireland) Ltd
  • Custom House Capital Ltd.
  • Eagle Star Life Assurance Co. of Ireland Ltd
  • ESB Building Society
  • Friends First Life Assurance Co. Ltd
  • Hibernian Life & Pension Ltd
  • Irish Life Assurance plc
  • New Ireland Assurance Co. plc/Bank of Ireland Life
  • The Standard Life Assurance Company

If you wish to contact any of the above, their contact details are available in the Golden Pages Telephone Directory or by contacting The Pensions Board.

Where can I get more information?
If you would like further information, you should contact:
The Pensions Board, Verschoyle House, 28 – 30 Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2.

Tel: + 353 1 613 1900 Fax: + 353 1 631 8602 Locall: 1890 65 65 65 (from Ireland only)
Web: http://www.pensionsboard.ie/


You should request a copy of their information booklet: Personal Retirement Savings Account (PRSAs) – A Consumer Guide.

back to top

Health Care

Private Health Care
You can avail of private health care if you can pay for it or you are covered by a health insurance scheme. Some employers offer health insurance as part of an employment package. The standard rate income tax on private health insurance is deducted at source which means you do not have to claim your tax relief at the end of the year. It is usual practice that no immediate benefit is available for medical conditions existing before taking out a private health insurance policy. The restriction shall be removed upon the following periods of continuous membership: 5 years for members under 55; 7 years for members aged 55-59; 10 years for members aged 60+.

I am returning to Ireland and I want to buy private health insurance
If you do not have pre-existing health conditions before you join a health insurance provider you will have immediate cover for any accidents or injuries. However, there is a waiting period of 26 weeks if you are less than 55 years of age or 52 weeks if you are aged 55+ before the insurance provider will cover any new health conditions. Applications to join from people aged over 65 will not be accepted unless they are transferring from certain other insurance companies. You will need to check which companies are acceptable by asking your health insurance provider. `

The three main private health insurers are:

  • VHI (Voluntary Health Insurance) VHI Healthcare can be contacted at: IDA Business Park, Dublin Road, Co. Kilkenny Tel: + 353 56 7753200 Customer service: 1850 444 444 Email: info@vhi.ieWeb: www.vhihealthcare.ie
  • Quinn Healthcare Quinn Healthcare can be contacted at:
    Mill Island,
    Fermoy,
    Co. Cork

    Tel: + 353 25 42121
    Customer Service: 1890 700 890
    Email: betteroff@bupaireland.ie
    Web: www.bupaireland.ie

  • VIVAS Health VIVAS Health can be contacted at:
    Vivas Health,
    Paramount Court,
    Corrig Road,
    Sandyford,
    Dublin 18

    Tel: + 353 1 4817800
    Customer Service: 1850 717 717
    Email: support@vivashealth.ie
    Web: www.vivashealth.ie

    back to top

    Public Health Care
    You are entitled to Irish public health services if you are “ordinarily resident” in Ireland (i.e. you must prove to the Health Services Executive that it is your intention to remain in Ireland) or if you are covered by EU regulations and you meet qualifying conditions.
    In 2005 the Health Boards changed their name to the Health Services Executive.

    Medical Card
    Am I entitled to a medical card?
    You will be entitled to a medical card if you satisfy one of the following conditions:

    • You satisfy a means test. Please see Medical Card Income Guidelines on page 8
    • You are aged 70 and ordinarily resident in Ireland
    • You have no income other than social welfare payments
    • You must not be employed or self-employed
    • You are a full-time student aged 16-25 and financially dependent on your parents (provided your parents have a medical card)
    • You are receiving an EU (European Union) or EEA (European Economic Area) social security payment and you are not in receipt of an Irish social welfare pension and you can not be employed or self employed
    • You are receiving state payments from an EU member State and you are not in receipt of any Irish state payments You may be entitled to a medical card if:
    • You are a student who is financially independent of your parents and you satisfy the means test
    • You are a student who is in receipt of Disability Allowance
    • Your income exceeds the Medical Card Income Guidelines, you may qualify for a medical card if the HSE (Health Services Executive) considers you are unable to provide necessary medical care for yourself or your family

    back to top

    What is the means test?
    A means test is a way of checking if you (and/or your spouse) have enough income to support yourself and what amount of payment, if any, you may qualify for. The following are the main items taken into account for the means test:
    • All your and your spouse/partner's cash income
    • The value of any benefit or privilege, for example, free board and lodging
    • The value of investments, savings or property (but not the value of your own home)

    What does the medical card cover?
    The medical card covers:

    • Free treatment from a General Practitioner (GP)
    • Free Prescriptions (some medication is not covered by the medical card. In such instances you are entitled to apply to the hardship scheme to cover the cost)
    • All in-patient public services in public wards (including consultant services)
    • All out-patient public hospital services (including consultant services)
    • Dental, Optical and Aural services and appliances
    • Maternity and Infant services
    • A range of Community Care and Personal Social Services

    Does the medical card cover my family?
    A medical card normally covers you, the cardholder, your spouse and any children under 16
    or children who are full-time students aged 16-25 and financially dependent on you. Where a husband and wife have separate incomes, their application for a medical card is assessed on the basis of their combined income.
    If you are aged 70 or over you will get a medical card regardless of your income. If your spouse is under 70, he or she will be means tested.


    Can I use my Irish medical card if I am abroad on holidays?
    No. The medical card is not recognised outside Ireland. If you are going to another EU or EEA member state for a temporary stay you are entitled to emergency medical services only. You must obtain the appropriate documentation from the Health Services Executive if you intend going abroad.

    What if I am not eligible for a medical card?
    If you do not qualify for a medical card you may be entitled to a reduced rate of medical care under the following schemes.
    page 4 of 8 Emigrant Advice - Returning to Ireland

    Doctor Visit Cards
    The new 'doctor visit cards' are for people whose income is 50% above the latest eligibility guidelines - this card will entitle holders to free access to GP services, however, they will have to pay for prescription drugs up to €85 and for hospital services. Please read Doctor Visit Cards Income Guidelines on Page 8.

    How do I qualify?
    You are eligible for a GP Visit Card if you pass a means test. You qualify in much the same way as qualifying for a Medical Card except that the income guidelines are 50% higher. These guidelines include allowances for those paying rent or a mortgage and/ or incur work related travel costs.
    You will qualify for a GP Visit Card if:

    • The combined income of yourself and your partner (if any) is less than the income guideline, which applies to your circumstances Or
    • It is decided by the Health Service Executive that financial hardship would arise because of your medical costs or other exceptional circumstances even when the combined income of yourself and your partner (if any) is greater than the income guideline, which applies to you.

    For example: if you have an ongoing medical condition that requires exceptional and regular medical treatment or visits to the doctor or hospital and the cost of this would cause you financial hardship, then a GP Visit Card may be granted on these grounds. A card may be granted for the whole family or for an individual member of the family on the grounds of financial hardship.

    How do I apply?
    You can use the same application form for a GP Visit card and a Medical Card and the Health Service Executive will always check your entitlement for a full Medical Card. You can get an application form for a GP Visit Card from the website www.hse.ie or at your local health Centre.
    Fill in each section that applies to you and return the completed form to your local health
    Centre. You will need to have your own PPS number (Personal Public Service Number) and PPS numbers for your dependants when applying for a card. You must insert the numbers on the application form.

    What if I am refused a GP Visit Card?
    You will receive a letter stating the reason(s) why you have been refused. If you are not satisfied with the decision, you may initially request your local health Centre to review your case. When seeking the review you should draw attention to any change in circumstances since you made your original application and include any relevant issues, which you may previously have overlooked. Alternatively you may appeal to the Appeals Office. The contact details will be contained in your letter of refusal.
    A card holder will also be entitled to the Drugs Payment Scheme Card which ensures that no individual or family need spend more than €85.00 per calendar month on approved prescribed drugs and medicines.

    Drug Payment Scheme
    The Drug Payment Scheme allows individuals and families who do not hold medical cards to limit the amount they have to spend on prescribed drugs. Under the Drug payment Scheme, you will not pay more than €85 in any calendar month for approved prescribed drugs, medicines and appliances.
    If you are ordinarily resident in Ireland, you are eligible to apply for the Drugs Payment Scheme. You can NOT hold a current medical card. You can use the drug payment scheme in conjunction with a Long Term Illness Book. Application forms are available from your local pharmacy or contact your local health board for further information.

    back to top

    Long-Term Illness Scheme
    The Long-Term Illness Scheme allows people with certain conditions, who are not already medical cardholders, to obtain the medicines and medical and surgical appliances they require for the treatment of their condition, without charge. You do not have to satisfy a means test.
    The conditions included in the scheme are:

    • Mental illness (up to age 16 only)
    • Mental disability
    • Multiple sclerosis
    • Diabetes insipidus
    • Muscular dystrophy
    • Diabetes mellitus
    • Spina bifida
    • Haemophilia
    • Hydrocephalus
    • Cerebral palsy
    • Parkinsonism
    • Epilepsy
    • Acute leukaemia
    • Cystic fibrosis
    If approved, you will be issued with a long-term illness book. Your pharmacist will provide you with the necessary drugs free of charge.

    Maternity and Infant Services
    The Health Services Executive provides free maternity services for Irish citizens for the period of pregnancy and for 6 weeks after the birth. The service is provided by your G.P. You must be an Irish citizen and be ordinarily resident in Ireland to avail of this service.

    Where can I get further information?
    If you would like further information, you should contact:
    The Department of Health and Children, Hawkins House, Hawkins St, Dublin 2.
    Tel: + 353 1 635 4000
    LoCall: 1890 200 311 (from within Ireland only)
    Web: www.dohc.ie


    Income Guidelines 2006
    Category Doctor (Weekly Rate) Medical Card Visit Card
    Single Person Living Alone
    Aged up to 65
    Aged between 66 –69 years €184.00 €276.00
    Single Person living with Family €201.50 €302.00
    Aged between 66 – 69 years €164.00 €246.00
    Married couple €173.50 €260.00
    Aged up to 65 years
    Aged between 66 – 69 €298.00 €447.00
    Aged between 70 – 79 years €596.50 €895.00
    Aged 80 years or over €627.00 €940.50
    Allowances
    Allowance for first 2 children under 16 years financially dependant on you €38.00 €57.00
    For 3rd and subsequent children under 16 years and financially dependant on you €41.00 €61.50
    Allowance for first 2 children over 16 years and financially dependant on you €39.00 €58.50
    For 3rd and subsequent children over 16 years and financially dependent on you €42.50 €64.00
    For a dependant over 16 years who is in full time third level education and not grant aided €78.00 €117.00
    Outgoings on house: rent/mortgage in excess of €23.00 €23.00

    back to top

    The above information has been kindly provided by http://www.emigrantadvice.ie

  • Source


    Tax Guide for Individuals Moving to the UK

    Tax administration and allowances

    Rice pasta sainsbury's car insuranceThe UK taxing authority is known as Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (or HMRC for short) and the tax year runs from 6 April to the following 5 April. There is no system of joint filing and married couples must submit separate tax returns.

    For tax resident individuals, a personal allowance of tax free income is available (this is £9,440 for tax year ending on 5 April 2014). Non residents who are UK citizens or EEA nationals can also claim a personal allowance.

    The personal allowance reduces for individuals with annual earnings of more than £100,000, (reducing to nil at £118,880 for 2013/14). In addition, certain “non-domiciled” individuals may be required to give up the personal allowance (more information on this is provided below).

    For 2013/14, the first £32,010 of earnings above the personal allowance (where available) is taxed at 20%, the next £117,990 is taxed at 40% and any balance above that is taxed at 45% (different tax rates apply for capital gains, dividends and certain savings income). There are also social security taxes, known as National Insurance Contributions, in addition to income tax. The employee rates for 2013/14 are 12% on earnings between £7,755 and £41,450 and 2% on earnings above £41,450.

    The UK does not have “itemised deductions” or similar. The main tax reliefs are limited to contributions to pension schemes or gifts to UK registered charities.

    Certain tax qualifying investments are available, including Individual Savings Accounts (ISAs). It is worth noting that investments that are qualifying in the UK are unlikely to have similar status outside of the UK and the tax advantages may be lost if you are still required to file a tax return as a resident or citizen of your home country.

    How is tax collected?

    Employees working in the UK are subject to Pay As You Earn (PAYE) tax withholding on cash payments and certain benefits. This applies even where an individual continues to be paid from outside of the UK.

    If you are an employee moving to the UK, your employer will submit a “Starter Declaration” to the tax authorities as part of the monthly online payroll reporting, which will provide certain personal information details, including your start date, address, date of birth and number of hours per week that you expect to work.

    Following receipt of the Starter Declaration, HMRC will issue a tax code to you and a copy to your employer which will then be used to determine the total amount of tax to withhold each pay period. The code can include taxable benefits, pension relief, underpaid tax for prior years etc and will differ significantly from one individual to another. The “standard” tax code for 2013/14 is 944L (which would mean that a full tax free allowance of £9,444 is being applied against income).

    At the end of each tax year, your employer will provide a Form P60 (details of pay received through payroll and tax withheld for the year) and may also provide Form P11D (details of non cash benefits provided, such as company car, private medical insurance etc). You will then be able to use these forms to prepare your tax return, if one is required (see below).

    If you are “self employed” or in a “partnership”, you will declare income through the filing of a tax return form and generally make tax payments twice a year, by 31 January and 31 July respectively.

    Tax returns

    The first thing to note is that not everyone in the UK is required to file an annual tax return. The typical taxpayers that generally must file are (this is not an exhaustive list):

    • Anyone earning more than £100,000 in a tax year
    • All self employed taxpayers
    • Taxpayers claiming non resident, or non domicile status
    • Anyone that has been issued with a tax return by HMRC
    • Any individual that has not had full tax withholding at source (note that if a taxpayer is aware that they will owe tax for a particular year they are required to request a tax return if one has not been issued – failure to request a return can result in a penalty charge!).

    If you fall into any of the above categories, or are able to take advantage of any tax relief claims for which a filing is required, you will need to complete and submit Form SA1 to HMRC in order to register and receive a tax filing number (known as Self Assessment number or Unique Tax Reference).

    If you want HMRC to calculate your tax or you are completing a “paper return”, you must submit your tax return by 31 October following the tax year end. In other cases, the return must be filed electronically by 31 January following the tax year end (this is the date that tax agents will typically work towards). There are no requirements for or ability to file extensions and an automatic penalty of £100 will apply if you are late, rising to £10 per day after three months up to a maximum 90 days.

    Following the submission of a return, HMRC has one year from the filing deadline to open an “enquiry”. This may consist of a few questions or they may request a full breakdown of information and additional personal details. If HMRC suspects that a taxpayer has been fraudulent, they have up to 20 years to raise assessments of underpaid tax.

    The full amount of any tax due must also be settled by 31 January following the tax year end, if interest and potential surcharges are to be avoided. In addition, if you have significant income not taxed at source, you may need to make payments on account. If this is the case, the first instalment will also be due by 31 January with the second payment due by the following 31 July.Green car insurance in sumter sc restaurants

    Payments on account are only generally required for those that are self employed, or where a taxpayer has a significant underpayment on their return and expects to owe a similar amount for the following year. It is possible to reduce or cancel a payment on account, however if a taxpayer does reduce too far, an interest penalty will be charged from the original due dates when the return is filed.

    Tax Residence status

    The basis on which an individual is taxed in the UK is dependent upon their residence status. This is a particularly complex area of taxation, but in general the following rules will apply

    You will be automatically resident if:Davina 5 week fit sainsbury's car insurance

    • You spend at least 183 days in the UK; or
    • You have your only home in the UK for more than 90 days, and that home is occupied for at least 30 days
    • You are in full-time work in the UK for a continuous 12-month period

    Ties to the UK

    If the above tests are not conclusive, then it will be necessary to determine the number of “ties” to the UK, based on the following (we would recommend seeking further advice in this instance)

    • Family tie: a spouse, civil partner or minor child is living in the UK (excluding children only in the UK due to boarding school arrangements who spend less than 21 days in the UK outside of term time)
    • Accommodation tie: available accommodation for a continuous period of at least 91 days, ignoring gaps of less than 16 days.
    • Work tie: at least 40 days are spent working in the UK (defined as 3 hours or more per day)
    • 90 day tie: more than 90 days spent in the UK in at least one of the two prior tax years
    • Country tie: applicable to leavers where more days are spent in the UK than any other single country

    Domicile status

    An individual can also claim non domicile status if this is beneficial. Domicile is less governed by the length of an assignment, and individuals who move to the UK but do not intend to remain on a permanent basis are likely to be able to claim non domicile status. If you are considered non domiciled in the UK, you will usually only pay UK tax on overseas investment income and gains to the extent that the income or proceeds are remitted to the UK, so this can be a very useful tax break.

    For the first seven years of tax residence, a non domiciled taxpayer has two options:

    1. Declare worldwide personal income and gains; or
    2. Only declare overseas personal income and gains if remitted to the UK, but give up the UK personal tax free allowance and capital gains tax allowance

    By concession a taxpayer that is in the first seven years of residency can elect option 2 without giving up the UK personal (and capital gains) tax allowances if their total overseas income and/or gains are less than £2,000 during the tax year.

    Once a taxpayer has been resident in the UK for more than seven tax years, option 2 remains available, however the taxpayer must then make an annual payment of £30,000 to HMRC to maintain this privilege. After 12 years, this increases to £50,000 per annum.

    Tax Planning

    There are a number of tax planning strategies that may be available to individuals moving to the UK which can significantly reduce the liability to UK tax. Many of these opportunities will require the correct structuring of a taxpayer’s financial affairs at the time of moving, and advice should therefore be sought at an early stage to maximise any applicable tax savings.

    In general, tax savings can be made for individuals who:

    • Are assigned to the UK by an overseas employer for a period of up to 2 years (see “A” below)
    • Are non domiciled and will have business travel outside of the UK (see “B” below)
    • Are in receipt of non UK investment income or gains on the sale of non UK assets (see “C” below)

    A: Detached duty relief

    HMRC will allow relief from income tax for travel and subsistence payments if they are incurred in the performance of the duties of the employment. This relief is commonly referred to as Detached Duty or Temporary Workplace relief.

    To qualify for relief an individual must be working away from their normal work location for a period of no longer than 24 months. This would typically apply to individuals that are “seconded” to the UK by an overseas employer for a fixed term assignment and not to individuals that move to the UK to take up a new UK employment (as to back up the temporary nature of the workplace, an existing relationship with a home country employer must remain). Where an individual qualifies for relief, the following expenses may be claimed:

    • The cost of travelling from home (or indeed anywhere) to the temporary workplace;
    • The reasonable cost of accommodation near the temporary workplace (including utilities);
    • Daily subsistence costs (to cover the cost of meals).   

    It should be noted that these expenses relate to the employee only and not their family.

    The rules are complex, but can provide a significant tax planning benefit. It is recommended that advice is sought at an early stage as it will be necessary to retain receipts and/or proof of payment in order to substantiate any claims.

    B: UK tax exemption for non UK working days

    An individual who is non domiciled and moves to the UK can claim UK tax exemption on the proportion of their employment income relating to days spent working outside of the UK. This applies to the year of transfer and subsequent two tax years.

    However, a condition of claiming this relief is that at least the amount being claimed as a deduction must have been paid and retained outside of the UK. If any amount of this claim is remitted to the UK, the tax relief available will be reduced accordingly.

    To take advantage of this tax relief, you should ensure that your net pay is delivered to a qualifying non UK bank account. If you are being paid by a UK employer, this can be achieved by using an offshore account with one of the major banks based in the Channel Islands or Isle of Man (whilst such branches remain part of the UK banking system, the jurisdictions are considered to be outside of the UK for taxation purposes). It is also important to note that the account should be in the sole name of the employee (although a joint account is acceptable provided that the spouse does not receive income directly to that account).

    C: Non domicile claims

    If you are considered non domiciled in the UK, you will not be required to declare or pay UK tax on any non-UK investment income or gains on the sale of non UK assets, provided any such income or gains are kept outside of the UK.

    Leaving the UK

    On leaving the UK, you will be automatically non resident if:

    • You spend less than 16 days in the UK; or
    • You spend less than 46 days in the UK and were not resident in the prior three tax years; or
    • You leave the UK under a full time contract of employment abroad (defined as an average 35 hour or more working week) and spend no more than:
      • 90 days in the UK per tax year
      • 30 working days (defined as 3 hours or more) in the UK per tax year

    As an example, if you leave the UK under a full time employment contract, you will generally become non resident if you expect to be absent from the UK either for at least a complete UK tax year (for example, a if you leave on 1 September 2013, you would need be absent until at least 6 April 2015 so that the tax year outside of the UK is then 2014/15).

    If you are leaving for another purpose, and do not meet the “automatically non resident test” then you will need to try and limit days spent in the UK based on the “Ties to the UK” rules outlined above.

    On leaving the UK, it is also necessary to submit a completed Form P85 to HMRC on departure. This form is generally used to claim non resident status in the UK, from which point only UK source income remains taxable.

    The typical income that a non-resident taxpayer will need to report to the UK authorities will be:Car insurance cheapest uk airline

    • UK investment income (bank interest / dividends)
    • Gains on sale of UK assets owned at departure (unless taxpayer is absent for at least five full tax years)
    • Stock / share option income where the grant was made prior to leaving the UK (taxed on workdays from grant to vest/exercise depending on treaty)
    • UK rental income
    • Earnings relating to UK workdays (in certain cases)

    In addition, a non resident taxpayer must report details of days spent back in the UK, including the number of those that are spent working and number of separate trips made (if they continue to have a UK filing requirement).

    National Insurance Contributions (NIC)

    The requirement to pay UK NIC will depend upon which country you have moved from, who your legal employer is and how long you expect to remain in the UK. If you are liable and an employee, you will be required to pay Class 1 Contributions.

    If you are seconded to the UK by an overseas employer within the European Economic Area (EEA), you will generally be required to continue to pay in your home country (and gain exemption from UK NIC) where the secondment is expected to last no longer than 24 months. For longer assignments, depending on the agreement between the member states in question, you may be able to pay only in the home country for up to five years. To make the claim your home country employer will be required to complete form A1 in order to obtain a “Certificate of Coverage”.

    If you are seconded to the UK by an overseas employer based outside of the EEA, but in a country which has a reciprocal social security agreement with the UK, you may also be able to remain in the home country scheme for two to five years. If you expects your assignment to last longer than the specified period, you will normally cease payments in the home country and commence payments in the UK.

    If you are seconded to the UK from a country other than the above (and remain employed by your home country employer), you will normally be required to pay UK Class 1 contributions from 52 weeks after your arrival.

    If you have moved to the UK as a local hire (i.e. to take up a UK employment contract), you will generally be required to pay into the UK system from day one.

    Pension

    In certain cases, it is possible to continue to participate in an overseas pension plan and gain the same tax advantages as a UK plan. This would mean that contributions would be tax deductible (subject to a maximum) and employer's contributions would be tax free. Each country will have a different agreement with the UK but as an example, a U.S. 401k pension plan, where contributions continue as part of UK service, would be specifically allowable under the UK/US treaty provided that the individual making the claim was a member of the plan prior to arrival in the UK.

    Use of tax treaties

    The UK has the largest network of Double Tax Treaties covering over 100 countries and used effectively, these can avoid a situation where a taxpayer becomes liable to both UK and overseas tax on the same item of income.

    A tax treaty will dictate which country has the right to tax which item of income, whether this is employment, capital gains, dividends, pension income etc.

    Treaties can often be used to provide exemption from tax on employment income, where an individual is seconded to the UK by an overseas employer for a limited period. The exact requirement will depend on the particular “home” country, however in general an individual that is seconded to the UK for a period of less than 183 days may be able to claim tax exemption in the UK. However in most cases this will only work if the salary costs are not recharged to the UK entity, so keeping below 183 days is not always sufficient!

    Further advice

    The above guidance is intended to be general in nature and as everyone’s position will be different, advice should be sought before relying on this. In addition, tax legislation is constantly changing and it is always good practice to review your tax situation on a regular basis.

    Tax Guide for Individuals Moving to the UK | Submitted by:   Richard Watts-Joyce of Global Tax Network

    Car insurance for 16 year old california

    Source


    Preparations for Moving Household Staff Recreation
    Visas and Documents Schooling Community Involvement
    Jobs Children and Family Life Religious Services
    Embassies Transportation Indonesian Culture
    Bahasa Indonesia Shopping Mixed Marriages
    Housing Banking and Finances Expat Stories
    Living Outside Jakarta Health & Medical Legal
    Communications Insurance Security Concerns
    Preparing your Home Cross Cultural Concerns

    An Overview of Indonesia - learn a bit about your new home

    Preparations for Moving to Indonesia

    • Preparing for your Move to Indonesia - Your Household Goods Shipment - answers to moving questions - what to bring and what to leave behind
    • Import Regulations for Used Household Goods and Personal Effects into Indonesia
    • Move Checklist - Preparing for your Departure from Indonesia
    • Ten Frequently Asked Questions About Moving to Indonesia
    • Relocation and Orientation Services - Ease your transition through professional help in settling in to your new life in Indonesia
      • Quality of Living Survey
      • Myths of Expatriate Life
      • Ways to Help Expatriate Families Adjust
      • Top Ten Tips for Working with Other Cultures
      • Top Ten Words to Internalize to Enjoy the Expat Lifstyle
    • Hit the Ground Running - what to do during your first weeks in Jakarta
    • Visas and Documentation - everything you need to know about paperwork you'll need
    • Job Seekers - looking for a job in Indonesia
    • Recommended Publications
    • Your Embassy In Jakarta
    • Learning Bahasa Indonesia - the National Language
      • A Short History of Bahasa Indonesia, the Indonesian National Language
    • Retirement in Indonesia
      • Frozen in Indonesia: Information for UK Pensioners in Indonesia
    • How Many Expats Live in Indonesia?
    • Ten Frequently Asked Questions About Moving to Indonesia
    • Apprehensions about Moving to Indonesia
    • Bits of Advice fo Expats

    Housing - Finding your new residence in Indonesia

    • Jakarta's neighborhoods
    • Real estate agencies and brokerage services
      • Residential Leasing Guidelines
    • Pitfalls of Renting Properties in Indonesia
    • Serviced apartments/Temporary housing
    • Leasing an apartment
    • Apartment Living in Jakarta
    • Buying property in Indonesia
    • Townhouses
    • Housing Estates
    • Hotels in Indonesia
    • Guesthouses and Indekos "Kos" Indonesian Bed and Breakfast
    • Housing Forum

    Security Concerns

    • Security at home and around town
    • Emergency Preparedness
    • Residential Security Basics
    • Household Security Rules
    • Residential Guards, Security Officers and Watchmen
    • Home Security During Vacations and Home Leave
    • Emergency Phone Numbers for Jakarta and Tangerang
    • Crime Statistics and Safety for Foreigners in Indonesia

    Living Outside Jakarta

    • International Schools Outside Jakarta
    • Community Groups in Areas Outside Jakarta
    • Worship Services in Foreign Languages
    • International SOS Medical Clinics and Assistance Centres around Indonesia
    • Bali
    • Balikpapan and Samarinda, Kalimantan
    • Bandung, West Java
    • Batam, Riau Islands
    • Bogor, West Java
    • Jayapura, Papua
    • Kuala Kencana, Papua
    • Malang, East Java
    • Manado, North Sulawesi
    • Mataram, Lombok
    • Medan, North Sumatra
    • Semarang, Central Java
    • Solo / Surakarta, Central Java
    • Surabaya, East Java
    • Yogyakarta, Central Java

    Communications - Keeping in Touch

    • Phones in your home
    • Hand Phones
    • Registration of Prepaid Hand Phone Cards
    • International telecommunication services
    • Internet Access Options in Indonesia
    • Home(s) away from Home - Expatriates and the Internet
    • International SMS Messaging to/from Indonesia
    • Mail amd international courier services
    • Keeping in touch with family and friends at home
    • Radio in Indonesia

    Preparing your new home for residence

    • Household Maintenance and Repairs
    • Electricity
    • Plumbing and water treatment maintenance - helpful tips
    • Household water supply and treatment systems
      • Saving Water - the brick displacement method
    • Bottled water
    • Bottled gas
    • Pest control
    • Creating & Maintaining a Beautiful Garden in Indonesia
    • Swimming Pool Maintenance and Repairs
    • Rainy Season Woes
    • Tips for Handling Roof Leaks
    • Pets in Indonesia
    • Decorating your new home
    • Insuring your personal possessions
    • Furniture
    • Furniture Rental
    • Air Conditioners & Air Conditioning
    • Television and Home Entertainment
    • Accommodating Noise Levels from the Local Mosque
    • Marine Aquariums

    Employing Household Staff

    • Household staff in your new home
    • Privacy Issues in Indonesia and how they affect expatriates
    • Medical Screening for Household Staff
    • Registration in the National Health Care Insurance program
    • Salary and Compensation
      • General guidelines for staff salaries
    • Guards
      • Household Security Rules in Bahasa Indonesia
    • Hiring a Driver
    • Baby-sitters, Nannies and other Child Minders
      • Training your Indonesian child minder in the developmental needs of toddlers
      • Child Care Provider First Aid Courses

    Schooling - Finding the best school for your children

    • Importance of Early Childhood Education
    • Strategies for Guiding Children towards Self Direction
    • Choosing a pre-school
    • International schools
    • National & SPK Schools
    • Courses, Lessons and Private Tutors

    Children and Family Life in Indonesia

    • Raising Expatriate Children in Indonesia
    • Registering the Birth of a Child in Indonesia
    • Adopting Children in Indonesia
    • Fun Things for Kids to Do in Jakarta
    • Babysitters, Nanies and other Child Minders
    • Child Care Provider First Aid course
    • Day Care for Chidlren in Indonesia
    • Celebrating the Holidays in Indonesia
    • Celebrating Halloween in Indonesia
    • Pets
    • Schooling / Education for Children
    • Bali Shopping Frenzy for Kids - Itinerary Idea
    • Spending A Couple of Days in Ubud with Kids
    • Northwest Bali Escapade with Kids
    • Snorkeling Trip for Kids to Amed and Tulamben – the East Coast of Bali
    • Toddler Stimulation (bilingual)
    • Strategies for Guiding Children Towards Self Direction
    • Nurturing Brain Connections: Maximize your baby’s full potential

    Transportation and Travel - Ways to get around during your stay

    • Airport Arrival and Departure Information intoJakarta Airport
    • Traditional and Modern Public Transport in Jakarta
    • Making a Driver's License
    • Hiring a Driver
    • Taxis
    • Safety Tips for Traveling by Taxi
    • Guidelines for Indonesian Motorbike Drivers
    • Leasing a car
    • Buying a car
    • Insuring your car
    • Prices of Gasoline in Indonesia
    • Hints for Dealing with Jakarta's Traffic
    • Travel Agents in Indonesia

    Shopping for your Daily Needs

    • Shopping in Jakarta
    • Supermarkets
    • Department Stores in Indonesia
    • Specialty Grocery Stores
    • Jakarta Malls and Shopping Centers
    • Christmas and Spring Community Bazaars in Jakarta
    • Shopping for essentials from the provinces
    • Florists and Ordering Flowers in Indonesia
    • Books and Bookstores in Indonesia
    • Traditional Markets
    • Bargaining Tips - How to Be a Success at Bargaining in Indonesia
    • Factory Outlet Shopping
    • Shops, Products and Services Directory
    • Shop Highlights
      • It's a Ming Thing
      • Pearls of Wisdom - shopping for pearl jewelry
      • The Cap Man - Cap in Hand!
      • Batik Canting

    Essential Services

    • Beauty Salons
    • Traditional Beauty Treatments
    • Men's Tailoring and Men's Clothing
    • Travel Agents in Indonesia
    • Foot Reflexology

    Banking and Personal Finances

    • Living in a rupiah world
    • Banking in Indonesia
    • Credit Card Fraud in Indonesia
    • Indonesian individual income tax
    • Investment advice and financial planning
    • What is Forex Trading?
    • Insurance in Indonesia
      • Medical insurance
      • Registration in the National Health Care Insurance program
      • The Importance of Home Contents Insurance
      • Travel Insurance

    Legal Matters

    • Legal Matters in Indonesia
    • Mediation Services in Indonesia
    • Marriage and its Legal Implications in Indonesia
    • Divorce for Foreigners inIndonesia
    • Child Custody & Maintenance in Indonesia
    • Expatriate / Indonesian Mixed Marriage Concerns
    • Visas and Documentation

    Health and Medical Concerns

    • Ask the Experts A forum for your medical questions
    • Medical facilities
    • Medical insurance
    • Mental Health in Indonesia
    • Registration in the National Health Care Insurance program
    • Optometrist, Ophthalmologist or Opticians and Eye Care in Indonesia
    • Physiotherapy Services & Physiotherapists in Indonesia
    • Dental Care in Indonesia
    • Chiropractic Services in Indonesia
    • Emergency Preparedness
    • Pharmacies/Apotik and Obtaining Medications in Indonesia
    • Choosing Online International Health and Medical Insurance for Expatriates
    • First Aid Courses
    • Child Care Provider First Aid Courses
    • Medical Screening for Household Staff
    • Blood Donations and Donated Blood in Indonesia - Rhesus Negative Blood
    • Singapore's Healthcare Services
      • Having a baby in Singapore
    • Health-related Links
    • Specific medical concerns:
      • Advice for Healthy Living while Staying in Indonesia
      • Air Pollution: Who Controls the Air we Breathe?
      • Amebic Dysentery
      • Anthrax as an Agent of Bioterrorism
      • Avian Flu
      • Black Henna Reactions from Temporary Tattoos
      • Chikungunya
      • Cholera
      • Conquer Your Cravings
      • Dangers of Alcohol to your Health
      • Dengue Fever
      • Detoxification
      • Ebola
      • Filariasis
      • Gastroenteritis
      • Getting Pregnant … and Infertility
      • Hand Foot and Mouth Disease
      • Having a Baby in Singapore
      • Health Affects of Air Pollution from Forest Fires
      • Health Concerns Due to Floodwater
      • Hepatitis A, B and C
      • Hypno Birthing - Taking the world by calm
      • Intestinal Worms
      • Japanese encephalitis
      • Leptospirosis
      • Malaria
      • Masuk Angin - what is it?
      • Medical Evacuations
      • MERS Coronaviruses
      • Neurofeedback As A Brain Self-Regulation Therapy
      • Organic Living - benefits for good health
      • Polio Update
      • Rabies
      • Ross River Fever
      • Schistosomiasis
      • Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)
      • Sexually Transmissible Disease and Sexual Behaviour: Effects on Healthy Residence and Travel Abroad
      • Snakebite Poisoning - Poisonous Snakes
      • Swimmer's Ear
      • Travel Insurance
      • Travelers' Advice - has recommended immunization information
      • Travelers' Diarrhea
      • Tuberculosis
      • Typhoid

    Recreation and Sports - Things to do in your leisure time

    • What Am I Going to Do With all this Free Time?
    • Rest and Relaxation in Jakarta
    • Fun Things for Kids to do in Jakarta
    • Meditation: An Investment in Yourself
    • Great Escapes - Travel through Indonesia on your next Vacation
    • Diving in Indonesia
    • Night Life in Jakarta: Bars, Clubs Discos and Night Clubs
    • Catering Your Party or Event in Indonesia
    • Places to Play Pool in Jakarta
    • Dining Out/Restaurants
      • Blok M Bars
      • Indonesian Food
    • Sports and Fitness Clubs
    • Yoga in Indonesia
    • Golfing in Indonesia
    • Courses and Lessons
    • Travel Links for Indonesia

    Community Involvement - Getting Involved in the Expat Community

    • Joining community organizations
    • Expatriate Community Organizations in Indonesia
    • Community Sports Clubs and Associations
    • Women who care
    • Giving Back - Supporting Indonesian Charities
    • Community Events Calendar
    • Community Bulletin Boards
    • Volunteering for this Web Site
    • Spending the Christmas/New Year Holidays in Indonesia
    • Celebrating Halloween in Indonesia

    Religious Services in Foreign Languages

    Indonesian Customs and Culture - Learn More about your Host Country

    • Wedding ceremonies and customs
    • Indonesian Food
    • Tipping in Indonesia
    • Indonesian holidays
    • Indonesian arts and handicrafts
      • It's a Ming Thing
      • Batik
      • Kebaya - Indonesian Traditional Dress for Women
      • The Cap Man - Cap in Hand!
      • Holding that thread of thought: an introduction to Indonesian Traditional Textiles and their traditional uses
      • Pearls of Wisdom - shopping for pearl jewelry
    • Indonesian children's games
    • How to wear a men's tube sarong

    Learn more about Indonesian Products

    • Tea for More than Two - Oolong Tea grown in West Java
    • Coffee in Indonesia - kopi in all its forms!

    Cross Cultural Concerns

    • Hints: Adapting to Your New Environment
    • Don't Call me Bule
    • Indonesian Cultural Habits and Idiosyncrasies: Tips for Cross-cultural Interaction
    • Cross Cultural Understanding - Business-related articles
    • Aida Speaks Out - an Indonesian Woman's Perspective

    Doing Business in Indonesia - Info from the Experts

    Mixed Marriages - Indonesians and Expatriates

    Expat Stories - the Humorous Side of Living In Indonesia

    Preparations for Moving | Visas and Documents | Jobs | Embassies | Bahasa | Housing | Living Outside Jakarta | Communications | Preparing your Home | Household Staff | Schooling | Transportation | Shopping | Banking | Insurance | Health & Medical | Recreation | Community Involvement | Religious Services | Indonesian Culture | Mixed Marriages | Expat Stories

    These articles are written by web site volunteers, in response to requests and postings from readers. The writers are seasoned veterans in Indonesia and endeavor to provide as wide a view on each subject as possible. The unlinked topics represent articles which are planned or under development. If your specific questions are not addressed, post your questions on the Living in Indonesia Forum. If you have unanswered questions or information you wish to contribute, please write to us.

    Source

    Add comment

    This e-mail already registered. or enter another.

    Error

    Sorry.
    ↑↑↑↑↑↑↑